CEO and Editor-in-Chief
Abdel Rahim Ali
Editorial Adviser
Roland Jacquard
ad a b
ad ad ad

Similarities found between far right, Daesh terrorism

Sunday 11/August/2019 - 12:12 PM
The Reference
Shaimaa Hefzy
طباعة

An article published at the BBC in March 2019 by Frank Gardner Far-right extremists in Britain have been accessing terrorism material published online by Daesh, according to counter-terrorism experts.

They say neo-Nazis and other right-wing extremists have been studying methods of attack shared by jihadists with their followers on the internet.

Since the middle of last year, MI5, the security service, has been tasked with helping the police tackle the growing threat from British far-right extremists.

Counter-terrorism officers have been using a range of methods, including phone taps, to gather intelligence on what the most violent individuals have been planning or aspiring to do.

But officials say that neo-Nazis and other extremists have also been accessing material to plan attacks published by their ideological enemies, Daesh.

This may seem strange, but it should not come as a surprise.

Their ideologies may be diametrically opposed to each other but there are some disturbing similarities between them, some of which are obvious, others less so.

Many white supremacists and violent Islamist extremists tend to inhabit a narrow-based world dominated by an all-consuming hatred and a total intolerance of anyone's views but their own.

For the jihadists of Daesh, for example, this means treating not only non-Muslims as enemies but also Shia Muslims and anyone they see as co-operating with "the non-believers".

Using the concept of "Takfir", jihadists will declare even their co-religionists as "unbelievers" and "apostates" and therefore in their eyes a legitimate target.

Likewise in the UK and the rest of Europe, far-right extremists see as enemies all those who - in their eyes - have helped enable changes that they dislike, such as allowing inward migration from Asia and Africa.

In 2011, the Norwegian extremist Anders Breivik carried out his murderous attack in Oslo, not on Muslims or immigrants, but on youth members of a party he blamed for changing the racial mix of Norway.

Daesh also shocked the world with its gruesome videos of hostages appearing to be beheaded on camera, as well as other atrocities such as men being thrown off high buildings after being "convicted" of homosexuality.

While these had the effect of alienating mainstream Muslim populations, they simultaneously attracted to the cause young men from around the world who often had criminal, psychopathic or sadistic dispositions.

Whitehall officials say far-right extremists have been sharing violent, satanic and occult images and videos, sometimes using gaming and music forums to recruit new members.

The aim, they say, is partly to desensitize people for the violence they believe is inevitable in a coming clash of civilizations.

 

 

"